Dr. Mona's Mom Blog

Weird Things About Newborns – Explained!

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Is this baby from another planet?!

Let’s be real, newborns can be really strange.

Having a baby can be straight-up weird! There can be a lot of strange things going on that you might not expect. Let’s dig in, to what the weird things about newborns are, and to calm your fears. Find out if that peeling skin and weird sounds when sleeping are par for the course or something you need to worry about.

BABY ACNE

This usually develops in the first six weeks as a result of hormones from mom. It’s usually located on the cheeks and nose. It’s best to do nothing, as it will go away on its own, and some products can irritate the skin.

If very severe or lasts beyond two months, speak to pediatrician, as we sometimes do recommend topical ointments to prevent scarring.

CRADLE CAP

These are greasy scales in the scalp or eyebrows. Also thought to be from hormones. It will go away on its own, but you can use coconut oil in the scalp and then comb with a soft brush.

SKIN PEELING A LOT

Common. They were in a water environment for nine months, and they came out dry! Nothing to do—it will peel off. If cosmetically bothersome to you, you can use non-fragranced baby lotion or ointment.

BREASTFED BABIES CLUSTER FEED

This is common when babies are trying to build your milk supply at various stages while breastfeeding. Hold strong, a rhythm will return.

SHAKING/TREMORS

Newborns have many jerky movements. When startled, they will jerk. When sleeping, they will jerk. If you notice rhythmic jerking with eye rolling and/or jerking that cannot be stopped when you apply pressure to
the extremity, speak to a clinician.

WEIRD SOUNDS WHEN SLEEPING

Newborns will grunt A LOT and make whimpers and sounds while they sleep. Totally normal. If baby is awake and in distress (you see the ribs retracting fast and/or with any color change), speak to a clinician.
Otherwise, no need to hover over them while they sleep. Always follow safe sleep practices.

HICCUPS

Common, especially if you felt this in utero! Don’t startle them or make them drink water like you do for adults. It will go away on its own.

PERIODIC BREATHING

This is when a baby breathes fast and then sloooows. Very common, and a more advanced breathing pattern will come. If constantly fast with any color change or ribs retracting quickly in and out, speak to a clinician.

ROLLING OVER

YES! Sometimes they get the momentum to roll by using their arms. For this reason, never leave them on a high surface unattended.

CROSS-EYED

This is normal! If it persists past six months OR baby is not tracking objects by two months, speak to a clinician.

DISCHARGE FROM THEIR EYES

This is likely caused by a blocked tear duct. Gently wipe away the mucus. You can massage the inner eye with your clean finger or Q-tip. If associated with bright redness in the eye or if it persists past one year of age, speak to a clinician.

HAVE MORE QUESTIONS ON WEIRD THINGS ABOUT NEWBORNS?

Why does their head look like that?

Are their hands supposed to be that color?

WHAT is this in their diaper?!

Instead of wondering if your baby is from another planet, download my free guide and get the low-down on all the weird things going on with your newborns!

PS: Looking for tips on how to soothe your newborn? Read this piece where I address common ways for soothing!

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All information presented on this blog, my Instagram, and my podcast is for educational purposes and should not be taken as personal medical advice. These platforms are to educate and should not replace the medical judgment of a licensed healthcare provider who is evaluating a patient.

It is the responsibility of the guardian to seek appropriate medical attention when they are concerned about their child.

All opinions are my own and do not reflect the opinions of my employer or hospitals I may be affiliated with.