First Time Moms Blog

Decision Fatigue is Real.

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Decision Fatigue is Real.

So what is decision fatigue?

Stressed out mom in blue shirt holding infant, leaning over sink with her head in her hand.

Decision fatigue is a psychological concept where our productivity and mental clarity suffers as a result of becoming overwhelmed from making repetitive, small decisions.

These decisions may seem small and irrelevant, but they compound and can clutter our mind.

Think about all the decisions you make for yourself, your partner, and your children on a daily basis.

You add in important, big decisions and you are constantly making choices and decisions for yourself and others.

I recently went through this and noticed that I was able to keep it together until my cup was full.

My cup can only hold so much and every question and every decision was a drop that kept adding to an almost full cup.

Finally, by the end of the day, my husband asked me “what’s for dinner?” and my cup overflowed “WHY do I have to figure out dinner?”

Hello, decision fatigue.

A simple question that had I not been overwhelmed, I wouldn’t be bothered by.

This concept is important in parenting.

We live our lives with work, life, parenting, and decisions. Sometimes, our child will ask us a question when our mind is fatigued and we may get upset. It isn’t always the question that was asked that got us upset, it’s our mental state at the moment. Had we had more space for those questions, for the tantrums, for the actions that can add to the business in our mind, we wouldn’t get frustrated by a single question or action.

I think of it like traffic. If you’re in a clear mental state, traffic will not bother you. It’s a reality of life, it’s there, we have to deal with it. There really is no other option but to wait and be patient. But, if your mind is cluttered, traffic will make you cranky and irritable.

Our goal should be to find ways to reduce the clutter and be able to manage the occasional traffic.

  1. Recognize when we may be approaching decision fatigue.
  2. Figure out ways to take a step back and reduce that mental clutter.
  3. Recognize how this fatigue can impact how we show up as parents and partners.

Have you ever had decision fatigue? What helped you?

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All information presented on this blog, my Instagram, and my podcast is for educational purposes and should not be taken as personal medical advice. These platforms are to educate and should not replace the medical judgment of a licensed healthcare provider who is evaluating a patient.

It is the responsibility of the guardian to seek appropriate medical attention when they are concerned about their child.

All opinions are my own and do not reflect the opinions of my employer or hospitals I may be affiliated with.