Dr. Mona's Mom Blog

The weather outside may be frightful, but play inside can be delightful!

share it

Keeping your kids active during inclement winter can be tough! Read this blog for top indoor activities to do!

Make sure to assess your child’s developmental ability for these various indoor activities. Some activities can be done earlier than listed and some can be a favorite even as the child grows up! Always supervise with smaller parts.

I compiled the below list for our community! I also added some of my favorite indoor activities.

Indoor activities for a 1-year-old

Developmentally, a 1 year+ is starting to show more independence and awareness for the world around them. They are explorers and want to touch, smell, and see everything. Begin engaging their senses with sensory play—shaving cream, paint, edible sand, etc. Incorporate activities that work fine motor skills (pipe cleaners into a strainer, pulling post-its off a wall) as well as music (drumming on pots and pans and having dance parties). Crawling over obstacles and tunnel games can help them develop motor skills as well.

  • Finger painting with edible paint
  • Water table
  • Yogurt painting
  • Shaving cream sensory play
  • Pulling post it notes off the wall
  • Crawling over obstacles
  • Crawling races
  • Card slot drop
  • Strainer and pipe cleaners
  • Pom Pom Oball Push
  • Sensory bin with edible sand
  • Play house with cardboard box
  • Tunnel activities
  • Indoor bowling
  • Dance party
  • Water plants
  • Spices sensory tray
  • Toys inside various boxes
  • Bubbles
  • Puppets
  • Sensory bins
  • Play with safe household items
  • Music with pots and pans

Activities for a 2-year-old

For 2+, independence and autonomy is growing. I included some Montessori-inspired activities as well. The goal here is to allow them to expand on their autonomy and independence. Teach them to pour water from jug to jug, allow them to cut a peeled banana with kid-safe utensils, allow them to have a play kitchen. It’s important to incorporate them into activities they see you do as well.

  • Drawing/coloring
  • Legos
  • Puzzles
  • Kinetic sand
  • Window cling stickers
  • Tea party
  • Play kitchen
  • Tag
  • Threading cheerios on spaghetti
  • Dress up
  • Hide and go seek with toys
  • Simon says
  • Trace body
  • Building blocks
  • Color sorting
  • Play Doh
  • Spooning and pouring of beans
  • Pouring water from jug to jug
  • Cutting a peeled banana
  • Magnatiles

Activities for a 3-year-old

For 3+, the independence continues. Continue make-believe. Imagination is thriving and it’s important they have the space to foster this. Play doctor/patient, play store, play with dolls, etc. Let them guide you with their imaginative play.

  • Obstacle courses
  • Water beads
  • Arts and crafts
  • Exploring house with flashlight
  • Putting away delivered groceries
  • Pillow fights
  • Involve in chores
  • Build a fort
  • Window paint coloring
  • Manga-tiles
  • Race car tracks
  • Scavenger hunt
  • Bingo
  • Matching games
  • Doll house
  • Necklace/bracelet making
  • Make believe
  • Playdoh with cookie cutters
  • Paint pasta and thread it

Make sure to listen to my podcast with Dr. Elina—Episode 51: Keeping Your Kids Active During a Pandemic Winter. Elina is a physical therapist and mom who talks about how we can keep our kids moving indoors during this pandemic in easy ways. She is also works from home and discusses ways to balance our busy lives and developmental activities that encourage movement and development.

PS: If you like the podcast and benefit from it, please make sure to leave a review!

Subscribe to the PedsDocTalk Newsletter

The New Mom’s Survival Guide

Course Support

Need help? We’ve got you covered.

getting ready for baby

Preparing for Baby Checklist

Pregnancy and baby planning can be stressful – make it a little easier by downloading our Preparing for Baby Checklist!

All information presented on this blog, my Instagram, and my podcast is for educational purposes and should not be taken as personal medical advice. These platforms are to educate and should not replace the medical judgment of a licensed healthcare provider who is evaluating a patient.

It is the responsibility of the guardian to seek appropriate medical attention when they are concerned about their child.

All opinions are my own and do not reflect the opinions of my employer or hospitals I may be affiliated with.